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Port Stanley News RSS Feed  News Central Elgin Regular/Planning Meeting Of Council On Monday, December 9th, 2019

News

by Doug Harvey

The Corporation of the Municipality of Central Elgin

Central Elgin Regular/Planning Meeting Of Council On Monday, December 9th, 2019

Roll Call - All Present.

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof - None disclosed.

Adoption of Minutes - No minutes to adopt.

Presentation

1. Central Elgin Housing Strategy Report
Tim Welch, Tim Welch Consulting was in attendance to present Central Elgin Housing Strategy Report.

Background - The impact of access to decent, safe and affordable housing is undeniable. Access to affordable housing allows families to have to make fewer trade-offs between household expenses and basic necessities. Several studies have indicated that access to quality, affordable homes is not only an important determinant of health outcomes but also integral for communities to achieve sustainable development targets.

In the Municipality of Central Elgin the need for affordable housing is significant and the lack of affordable housing affects the both individual residents and the collective well-being of local communities in Central Elgin.

For instance, residents that have high housing costs generally have less income remaining to spend on goods and services which results in less money spent on local business, thereby decreasing the opportunity for business growth. Furthermore, although the impact of access to safe, suitable and adequate affordable housing on individuals and families are profound for almost everyone, it often disproportionately affects vulnerable groups including seniors, single parent households, Indigenous families, and new immigrants, and persons earning moderate income in the retail, tourism and service sectors.

In recent years, sharp rises in rental and ownership prices, low rental vacancy rates and limited housing supply have characterized many of the housing markets in in Southern Ontario. Moreover, some housing markets have experienced the ripple effects of neighbouring markets with extremely high housing prices. For instance, the Greater Toronto Area’s (GTA’s) strong housing market has, in many ways, influenced the recent surge in housing prices in markets across Southern Ontario as buyers look for more affordable units and, as some retirees are looking to downsize and use the equity built up in their Toronto area homes. As such, Central Elgin, Elgin County, St. Thomas and other regions have experienced significant increases in housing prices over the last few years.

Given the growing concern surrounding affordable housing, policymakers and politicians alike have engaged in discussions to address the mounting challenges facing housing. The federal government recently announced a 10-year, $55 billion National Housing Strategy. In addition, the provincial government announced in 2019 both the Community Housing Strategy and the Fair Housing Plan. The overall objectives of these policies are to address the need for affordable housing by increasing the supply of new affordable rental housing while preserving the existing social housing stock.

Purpose of the Strategy

The primary purpose of the Central Elgin Affordable Housing Strategy is to set out local goals and actions which can help address the need for affordable housing. The strategy will have with a particular focus on housing for seniors and younger families wanting to stay in or move to Central Elgin. The local actions in the strategy should be undertaken in the context of Policies and Programs of the Federal, Provincial and Service Manager levels of government and should seek to leverage as much of the funding or financial resources available through the programs offered through those levels of government.

In support of the strategy, the following are provided:

  • Establishing how affordable housing can be defined
  • An overview of housing needs and demands to establish what kind of affordable housing is needed presently within Central Elgin
  • An overview of the current policies of programs of the Federal, Provincial and Service Manager levels of government;
  • A high level summary of best practices in other municipalities to provide examples of housing policies and programs which are appropriate for Central Elgin;
  • Recommending potential financial incentives within Central Elgin to help support the construction of affordable housing
  • Providing recommendations on the implementation of second unit policies for Central Elgin’s zoning-by laws
  • Recommending the creation of a municipal housing facilities by-law and Community Improvement Plan for affordable housing, incorporating best practices: and
  • Encouraging the use of the resources of community organizations and the private sector which can help support meeting the affordable housing needs of Central Elgin

What is Affordable Housing?

There are many different ways of defining affordable housing. Some definitions exist in provincial laws, different definitions exist in housing programs and for many people, there is a very personal definition of what housing can they afford based on their own incomes. Below is a brief overview of various definitions.

1.1 Provincial Definition

To provide guidance on how municipalities should define affordable housing within their respective planning policies, the Provincial Policy Statement (2014) provides the following language for affordable ownership and rental housing in Section 6.0:

a) In the case of ownership housing, the least expensive

  • 1. Housing for which the purchase price results in annual accommodation costs which do not exceed 30 percent of gross annual household income for low and moderate income households; or
  • 2. Housing for which the purchase price is at least 10 percent below the average purchase price of a resale unit in the regional market area

b) in the case of rental housing, the least expensive of:

  • 1. A unit for which the rent does not exceed 30 percent of gross annual household income for low and moderate income households; or
  • 2. A unit for which the rent is at or below the average market rent of a unit in the regional market area

Central Elgin has adopted this definition of affordable housing in its Official Plan and there is no need to change that definition.

In many municipalities that undertake affordable housing initiatives, this second rental housing definition, - where rent is at or below CMHC average market rents, is the most commonly used definition when offering financial incentives or financial relief from municipal fees and charges, to create new affordable housing. Many by-laws - known as municipal housing facility by-laws that provide for financial assistance for affordable housing - use this definition.

1.2 CMHC Definition of Affordable Housing

Although the definition of affordable housing can differ from one area to another, traditionally within the housing industry and according to the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), housing is affordable for a given household if it costs less than 30% of gross (before-tax) household income.

1.3 Affordable Housing Definition as per Housing programs

It is important to note the definition of affordable housing in the Provincial Policy Statement, 2014 differs from the definition in the federal-provincial Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) Program, now replaced by the Ontario Priorities Housing Initiative (OPHI). That is, for properties built or renovated under the IAH/OPHI the following criteria applies:

  • 1. Affordability is defined as having rents for the project that are at or below 80% of CMHC Average Market Rent (AMR) in the service manager's area at the time of occupancy where actual rents are calculated using actual rents paid by tenants and any rent supplements provided by the Service Manager. For example, in the St. Thomas-Elgin county area, an affordable one bedroom apartment would be $550 under this program while and two bedroom would be $684 per month.

Population Trends and Projections in Central Elgin

It is important to examine population and household characteristics when evaluating the housing needs within a community.

Central Elgin experienced a modest 1.1% population decline from 2011 to 2016 while Elgin County and the City of St. Thomas experienced modest population growth of 1.7% and 2.6% respectively.

In 2016, nearly 20% (19.5%) of the Central Elgin Population were seniors aged 65 and older. In comparison, only 16.7% of Ontario’s population was 65 years and older.

From 2011 to 2016 the number of seniors in Central Elgin increased by 27%, the number of persons aged 55 – 64 increased by 2% while all other age groups experienced a decrease in numbers.

Household Trends and Characteristics

It is important to understand household characteristics when evaluating the need for housing including trends in the number, tenure, size, and type of households in a community to understand the housing need in that community.

While there was a very modest decrease in population, there has been an actual increase in the number of households due, in part to decreasing household sizes. There were 4,925 households in Central Elgin in 2016; increasing by 3.1% from 4,775 in 2006.

Household Type

In 2016, couples without children made up 38.1% of all households in Central Elgin compared to 28.7% in Ontario. In addition, persons living alone made up 18.4% of all households in Central Elgin and the number people living alone increased by 1% from 2011 to 2016. The highest overall increase was seen for couples without children, increasing by 7% from 2011 to 2016.\

Household Tenure

In 2016, 89% of households in Central Elgin owned their homes. Renter households made up 11.0% of all households in Central Elgin. Across Ontario, 69.7% of households owned their homes while 30.2% of households were renters. The minimal change in the proportion of owner and renter households in Central Elgin over the last ten years indicates Central Elgin is more rural in nature than comparable communities. However, it may also indicate a lack of rental housing as many residents are looking to downsize.

Household Size

Households with two persons made up the largest proportion of households in Central Elgin in 2016; making up 42.9% of all households, followed by one-person households that constituted 18.5% of all households.

The growing number of smaller households as well as a decrease in the number of couples with children in Central Elgin, and increase in number of households, indicate an aging population. More specifically, many developers in the area suggested there has been an increase in empty nesters moving into the area looking to downsize from their existing dwellings, most of whom are seniors and retirees that have moved into the area from the GTA and, people from London looking to take advantage of comparably cheaper prices.

Household Income Spent on Housing

CMHC defines affordable housing as housing that costs less than 30% of before-tax household income.

There are currently 705 households with affordability issues in Central Elgin, of which 480 are owners and 225 are renters. However, 41.6% of all renter households are spending 30% or more on housing costs and in comparison, only 16.2% of owner households are spending more than 30% or more on housing costs. This suggests a significant need for more affordable rental units.

Overall Housing Supply

Single detached dwellings made up the majority of housing stock in Central Elgin constituting 93.1% of all dwellings in 2016. This is much higher share compared to 54.3% in Ontario as a whole. Apartments in Central Elgin currently represent only 3% of the housing stock. However, current analysis indicates households are becoming more diverse in terms of housing need. Currently Central Elgin is experiencing an aging population that is looking to downsize and shift to smaller households which implies a need for accessible apartments or accessible row-house style units (both rental and ownership) in the future.

New Homes in Planning

According to the Municipality of Central Elgin, there are a currently a total of 1,400 dwellings in planning approval. If all of these homes are built, this would represent a 28% increase in dwelling units for the municipality. Of these new homes, single detached dwellings accounted for 46.2% of all households in planning, followed by semi-detached which constituted 6.1%, then row houses which made up 6.3% and finally apartment buildings at 42.3%.

The increase in apartment buildings under planning approval confirm that individuals are looking to downsize, and that there will be an overall change in the type of housing in demand in Central Elgin. In general, the most appropriate dwelling type for seniors, persons with disabilities and people living alone is not single-detached homes and that may be a reason why there are more apartments in the planning approvals process. Furthermore, single-detached homes are often more expensive and with individuals looking to purchase more affordable units, a housing supply that is disproportionately made up of single-detached homes will not appropriately meet the housing needs of its residents.

Purpose Built Rental Stock

There are currently 540 rental units in Central Elgin. Of those, 63.8% are single-detached, 2.8% are semi-detached, 6.5% are row houses and 27.1% are apartment buildings. In comparison, 13.2% of the rental stock in Ontario are single-detached, 3.7% are semi-detached, 8.9% is row housing, and the remaining 77.9% are apartment buildings. In general, these figures are consistent for small urban centres and rural areas due to the relatively small rental market as compared to larger urban areas.

There is one non-profit housing development in Central Elgin, the Kettle Creek Village, which is owned by the Municipality of Central Elgin. This is a two-story, 30-unit, non-profit seniors housing complex located at 289 Frances Street in Port Stanley with 18 one bedroom apts., 12 two bedroom apartments and an elevator. The building has a mixture of low end of market rents and apartments with Rent geared to Income assistance. It will be important to preserve and maintain this accessible, affordable rental housing.

However, the vast majority of housing units in Central Elgin are private market housing units and include both rental and ownership units.

Average Rents in Rental Universe

The average market rent of units in the primary rental market was $799 based on the 2016 census. In the 2016 census the average rent in St. Thomas was $817. CMHC does not survey average rents in Central Elgin annually but does survey average St. Thomas rents and in the fall of 2018 the average rent in St. Thomas had increased significantly to $910. The average one bedroom rent in St. Thomas 2018 was $694 while the maximum shelter allowance for a single person receiving a disability pension is $497 per month – a significant $200 per month gap. And a single senior receiving a basic CPP/OAS/GIC pension would have to spend 44% of their income to afford the average one bedroom rental apartment in the St. Thomas area.

Ownership Cost Trends

The increase in the cost of buying a home in Elgin County has been significant. Between 2011 and 2019, the resale values of homes increased 64.9% ($140,00 or $17,500 annually). The rate of inflation during that same period was 16.4%. This suggests that the influx of individuals looking for affordable housing are driving the prices up in Elgin County and Central Elgin.

In addition, of the current units listed for sale in Elgin County only three dwellings or 3% of current listings are available at/below the 60th percentile as defined in Central Elgin’s Official Plan (income: $296,300).

Need and Demand Conclusion

Given both the significant increase in senior population in recent years (a trend which is expected to continue) and the high proportion of renter households with an affordability issue, efforts to increase the supply of affordable housing should be concentrated on creating new affordable housing with a focus on seniors affordable rental housing as well as rental housing for single persons and family households which will be needed to work in the service sector (including service industries which will expand to reflect the future growth of seniors of all income levels in the community).

Best Practices for Housing Assistance

In Central Elgin it would be appropriate to focus any municipal incentives for affordable housing in the designated urban settlement areas that the municipality is targeting for population growth.

It is also worth noting that in order to maximize the financial effectiveness of municipal financial assistance, there would need to be a parallel approach by the County of Elgin on its fees and charges for new affordable developments.

It is also worth noting that the recently passed Bill 108 permits municipalities to provide for a 20 year deferral of development charges for affordable non-profit housing.

One of the primary reasons for using CIPs rather than broad based policies is due Section 106 of the Municipal Act (2001) which prohibits municipalities from directly or indirectly assisting any manufacturing business or other industrial or commercial enterprises through the granting of certain financial incentives. These prohibited financial incentives includes:

  • giving or lending money, or municipal property;
  • leasing or selling any municipal property at below fair market value;
  • guaranteeing borrowing; and
  • giving a total or partial exemption from any levy, charge or fee.

Land

The contribution of land for an affordable housing development can make a significant difference in improving the affordability of a new housing development. As part of a housing strategy there should be a full examination of the land holdings of both the Municipality and the County land holdings in Central Elgin to see if there are sites that would be appropriate (in the growth nodes, close to services) for consideration for a new housing development with the goal of having that land provided at no cost either through a transfer or long term lease. While the intensification of existing non-profit housing has been undertaken in some areas of Ontario but the one existing Kettle Creek non-profit site in Port Stanley appears to be fully utilized with building and parking spaces.

Land for affordable housing could also be identified through an invitation to community organizations, faith groups, service clubs and other not-for profit (or for profit) land owners to contribute land towards a new affordable housing development as has been done in other communities in Ontario.

New Affordable Housing

In order to try and encourage the development of new affordable housing, the Municipality could reach out to a variety of non-profit and private sector organizations by the Municipality sponsoring an information session about affordable housing. This session could include:

  • information on financial assistance that could be available from all levels of government;
  • solicit interest from organizations potentially interested in sponsoring or developing housing;
  • gathering information on possible appropriate land in the community that could be made available/donated/leased for affordable housing.

It is our understanding that Municipal staff have been raising the issue of creating some affordable units within larger private developments but have been meeting resistance from the private developers. If Central Elgin can offer municipal incentives as per recommendation 1.3 below and if Central Elgin can connect an affordable housing property manager with the developer for the affordable units, there may be more of an ability to successfully negotiate some affordable units within a development. Given the clear affordable housing development goal in the Central Elgin’s Official Plan, the Council of Central Elgin (with support from the County of Elgin), should firmly require developments to do their part to achieve the Official Plan affordable housing goal.

Staff (supported by Council) of Central Elgin should continue to work with proposed new subdivisions and multi-residential/apartment developments to ask the proponents how their developments will help meet the affordable housing goals of the Official Plan. Those discussions (supported by firm backing of Council, combined with municipal incentives), should allow an opportunity to encourage and negotiate commitments from developers that would result in a portion of the development to be affordable.

Secondary Suites

While new affordable housing is often thought of in terms of developing a new apartment building or townhouse development, new affordable rental units can also be created through smaller scale intensification of exiting housing stock. Adding an apartment within an existing single-family home, or through converting garage space to a second unit/apartment is often referred to as adding a secondary suite or second unit.

The provincial government has required municipalities to permit Secondary Suites in existing detached, semi-detached and row housing over the past few years. Central Elgin has provided for “Second Residential units” in its most recent Official Plan, setting the stage for welcoming new rental units. Central Elgin’s OP on Second Residential Units also complies with the County of Elgin’s Official Plan on second units.

In order to encourage more new rental second residential units, some of which will be affordable, Central Elgin should amend its zoning by-laws to clearly make second units “as of right” as long as they comply with Building and Fire codes. Having to go through a public hearing process of a minor variance application discourages home owners from moving forward with adding second units, or, unfortunately, sometimes results in home owners creating new units without permits, meaning the new units are not necessarily building code compliant or safe. A legal, inspected unit also ensures the municipality is aware of the unit’s existence which is important for fire safety reasons, among others. However, once a new legal unit is created, it should not be subject to any additional licensing/inspection requirements/costs than other rental properties in the municipality.

Key considerations in the zoning-bylaw to encourage the creation of more second unit rental housing should include:

  • Permitting second units in single detached, semi-detached and row/townhouse dwellings;
  • Identifying which land use zones second units should be permitted in;
  • Identifying locations where second units should not be permitted due to servicing capacity or natural hazard concerns;
  • Maximum unit size;
  • Location of second unit entrance and extent of exterior alterations to the principal dwelling permitted;
  • Number of required parking spaces for the second unit (ideally no more than one extra space for the second unit);
  • Conditions to permit tandem parking (e.g. min. driveway width); and
  • Ensuring that all other provisions of the City's zoning by-laws are complied with.

To help generate awareness and interest among homeowners, it is recommended that Central Elgin creates an education program/educational materials on-line and in print that promotes the creation of second units in newly built and existing dwellings.

Recommended Actions

  • 1.1 Generate awareness and interest among homeowners by creating education programs that promote the creation of second units in newly built and existing dwellings
  • 1.2 Central Elgin should update their zoning by- laws provide reasonable development standards for second units:
    • Identify locations where second units should not be permitted due to servicing capacity or natural hazard concerns
    • Require no more than one additional parking space for a second residential unit
    • Permit tandem parking (with min. driveway width and ensuring that all other provisions of the City's zoning by-laws are complied with).
    • Flexibility with requirements for the provision of a second entrance
    • Minimum sizes should not be any larger than other minimum unit size requirements in the municipality
  • 1.3 Central Elgin should implement financial incentive options (and encourage the County of Elgin to similarly adopt financial incentive options) for affordable housing developments. These could include:
    • Waiving development approval fees
    • Waiving/deferring development charges and parkland fees
    • Tax increment financing over a long-period of time or property tax exemption
  • 1.4 Central Elgin should create a municipal housing facilities by-law and a Community Improvement Plan for affordable housing (with the goal of providing financial assistance), defining affordable housing as rental units with average rent (as reported by CMHC) or less
  • 1.5 Central Elgin should reach out to potential housing collaborators, including private developers and community groups, to identify underutilized and surplus land within Central Elgin which would be suitable for affordable rental housing
  • 1.6 Have the Municipality of Central Elgin and the County of Elgin to review their land holdings, and identify sites suitable for new multi-residential use and transfer (or provide a long-term lease) to the proponent of the new municipal housing
  • 1.7 Host an affordable housing information session which would link rental housing proponents and first time home buyers to CMHC and Service Manager housing assistance programs.
    Ideally this will lead to a local champion/sponsor of new housing, to submit a seed application and access other existing CMHC programs and reach out to Service Manager about accessing potential capital funds
  • 1.8 Improve Municipal Regulatory and Processing Tools (i.e. expedited processing and reducing parking requirement to 1:1 for new affordable housing)
  • 1.9 Have Central Elgin Council provide clear direction to Municipal Staff to require a portion of all new housing developments include a portion of units as affordable in order to meet the Official Plan Goal. This requirement should be combined with incentives in recommendation 1.3

Given the current and emerging housing gaps within Central Elgin, the housing needs assessment identified key areas that need to be addressed: a need for a more diverse housing supply which will better address the housing need for residents of Central Elgin and an increase in purpose built rental housing to address an aging population looking to downsize.

In addition, this strategy has recommended a total of 9 actions to help address these housing gaps. These actions include providing financial incentives and expanding on policy/planning strategies to encourage the development of affordable housing.

Councillor Roberts commented that if she were looking for affordable housing, she would not pick Central Elgin because there are no jobs for her and no public transportation. So if we promote affordable housing in Central Elgin are we just providing more affordable housing to the people that can already afford housing in Central Elgin.
Mr. Welch replied that with the increase in seniors moving to Central Elgin that this creates a demand for more retail and support services in the community and that these services have traditionally had lower wages and would in order to fill these positions need affordable housing.

A Motion moved by Deputy Mayor Marks and seconded by Councillor Fehr be it Resolved that Council receive Report 2019 Central Elgin Housing Strategy prepared by Tim Welch Consulting Inc. ; And that staff be requested to prepare a report for Council's consideration outlining costs, and processes to implement the reports recommended actions with such costs being incorporated into the 2020 Proposed Budget. Carried.

Delegation(s)

1. Port Stanley Community Policing
Ross Whalls, a Port Stanley Community Police Volunteer was in attendance to discuss crosswalks.

Mr. Whalls - Because of the length of time that the Bridge will be closed for, there is five areas of concern:

  • The first is Carlow Road where the sidewalk ends at the north end;
  • The second is on Carlow Road by the condos. One day I watched 24 people crossing when school was out;
  • The third is Warren Street where both sidewalks end;
  • The fourth is Warren Street and Colbourne Street - the one has a speeding problem;
  • The fifth is Colbourne Street by Foodland where both sidewalks end.

Now there are large trucks on Carlow and Warren all the time, and when following these trucks one can't always see people trying to cross the road. I also observed a car travelling in the school zone around noon at speeds in excess of 105 kph. Speeding by 60% of vehicles using Carlow seems to be an ongoing problem.

Mr. Brooks commented that the County would be installing 3 temporary fully lit crosswalks, one on Carlow, Warren, and Colbourne by Foodland, for the duration of the Rehabilitation of the King George Vl Lift Bridge. There is also a good possibility of a traffic light at the intersection of Warren and Colbourne. As part of the 2020 Budget, funds have been proposed for a permanent single fully lit crosswalk to be installed in a location yet to be determined in Central Elgin.

Mr. Whalls - Temporary crosswalks are great, but what happens after the brige work is done?
Mayor Martyn - At least we will have them for the next year and a half.

Correspondence (Action)

1. Port Stanley Village Association (PSVA)
Correspondence received from the PSVA respecting "trust fund" monies.

A Motion moved by Deputy Mayor Marks and seconded by Councillor Fehr: Whereas Council passed a resolution on Monday, January 14th, 2019 respecting the establishment of a Trust Fund to be held by the Municipality for a fundraising campaign to support PSVA initiated projects on Municipal property; Whereas correspondence has been received from the PSVA dated November 25, 2019 stating that they do not require that the funds be held in trust; Now therefore be it resolved that Council direct staff to allocate funds from the PSVA fundraising efforts to a discretionary reserve instead of a in trust; And further that said funds in the reserve will be used for Municipal project that is mutually agreeable to both the PSVA and the municipality for such projects that are expected to arise for the harbour and related park areas once all planning stages are complete. Carried.

2. Kettle Creek Conservation Authority - 2020 Levy
Kettle Creek Conservation Authority has always worked with its member municipalities to collaboratively develop programs and services that promote, restore and protect a healthy watershed in a fiscally responsible manner. To this end, and in order to facilitate municipal 2020 budget planning, at its November 7, 2019 meeting KCCA’s Board of Directors directed staff to proceed with a draft 2020-2023 Budget based on a 3% levy increase in each of the four years, in 2020, this would mean an increase to the Municipality of Central Elgin of $2,093 over 2019.

A Motion moved by Councillor Crevits and seconded by Councillor Roberts that Council of the Corporation of the Municipality of Central Elgin approve Central Elgin's apportionment of the 2020 Kettle Creek Conservation Authority 2010 Levy in the amount of $79,685.41. Carried.

Correspondence (for Council's Information)

A Motion by Councillor Row and seconded by Deputy Mayor Marks that Correspondence for Council's Information Items #1 - #6 inclusive be received as information and filed. Carried.

1. Ontario's Building Code
Correspondence received from the Township of Perry and the Municipality of South Huron respecting Transforming and Modernizing the Delivery of Ontario's Building Code (deferred from Nov 25)

2. Joint and Several Liability Consultation
Correspondence received from the Town of Amherstburg respecting Joint and Several Liability.

3. Climate Emergency
Correspondence received from the Town of Amherstburg respecting Climate Emergency.

4. Conservation Authority Levies
Correspondence received from the Township of Springwater respecting Conservation Authorities Levies.

5. Electronic Delegations
Correspondence received from Township of Greater Madawaska respecting electronic delegations with Ministers and the Premier.

6. BIA Board of Management
Copy of minutes from the BIA Board of Management meeting dated Wednesday, November 6th, 2019.

Reports

Committees

1. CAO 62-19 Special Events - 2020 PSVA Harbour Hustle

A Motion moved by Councillor Row and seconded by Councillor Roberts that Council approve the Special Event Permit for 2020 PSVA Harbour Hustle event to be held Saturday, May 16, 2020 in Port Stanley from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. subject to the following recommended conditions:

  • The organizers complying with the Special Events Policy as adopted by Council;
  • Liability Insurance be provided by the organizers of the event in the amount of $5,000,000.00 naming the County of Elgin and the Corporation of the Municipality of Central Elgin as co-insured and held harmless; and
  • The final schedule and location of the event being approved by the Director of Infrastructure and Community Services as per Report CAO 62-19.

Carried.

2. CAO 63-19 Special Events - 2020 Childcan Port Stanley Polar Bear Dip

A Motion moved by Councillor Row and seconded by Councillor Crevits that Council approve the Special Event Permit for 2020 Childcan Port Stanley Polar Bear Dip event to be held Saturday, March 7, 2020 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. subject to the following recommended conditions:

  • The organizers complying with the Special Events Policy as adopted by Council;
  • Liability Insurance be provided by the organizers of the event in the amount of $5,000,000.00 naming the Corporation of the Municipality of Central Elgin as co-insured and held harmless;
  • The final schedule and location of the event being approved by the Director of Infrastructure and Community Services; and
  • The applicant being responsible for contacting St. John's Ambulance or a similar organization to be on site during the event as per Report CAO 63-19.

Carried.

Central Elgin Planning Office

1. CEP 74-19 Amendment to Elgincentives Community Improvement Plan (CIP) 2019

A Motion moved by Councillor Roberts and seconded by Councillor Fehr that Report CEP 74-19 be received as information; And that direction be given by Council to prepare a by-law, pursuant to Sections 17 and 28 of the Planning Act, to adopt the Municipality of Central Elgin Elgincentives Community Improvement Plan Updated March 2019; And further that a date for a public meeting be scheduled for January 27th, 2020 at 6:55 p.m. in accordance with Ontario Regulation 543/06 as amended. Carried.

2. CEP 75-19 Application to Amend Village of Port Stanley By-law 1507, 403 Stanley Park Drive - Cathy & Tim Kostendt

A Motion moved by Councillor Crevits and seconded by Deputy Mayor Marks that Report CEP 75-19 be received as information; And that direction be given by Council to prepare a site-specific draft amendment to the Zoning By-law in support of the proposed residential use on lands located at 403 Stanley Park Drive, which may be legally described as Plan M61, Lot 8, geographic Village of Port Stanley, now Municipality of Central Elgin; And further that a date for a public meeting be scheduled for January 27th, 2020 at 7:20 p.m. in accordance with Ontario Regulation 543/06 as amended. Carried.

3. CEP 76-19 Application to Amend the Municipality of Central Elgin Official Plan and the Village of Port Stanley By-law 1507 - 349 George Street - Gerry Hensels

A Motion moved by Councillor Fehr and seconded by Deputy Mayor Marks that Report CEP 76-19 be received as information; And that direction be given by Council to prepare site-specific draft amendments to the Municipality of Central Elgin Official Plan and the Village of Port Stanley Zoning By-law for the proposed severance's and residential uses on lands located at 349 George Street, which may be legally described as Plan 117, Lot of Lots 5 to 7, geographic Village of Port Stanley, now Municipality of Central Elgin; And further that a date for a public meeting be scheduled for January 27th, 2020 at 7:10 p.m. in accordance with Ontario Regulation 543/06 as amended. Carried.

Chief Administrative Officer

1. CAO 65-19 Customer Service/Complaint Resolution Policy - Report of Municipal Ombudsman

A Motion moved by Councillor Row and seconded by Councillor Fehr that Report CAO 65-19 Customer Service/Complaint Resolution Policy - Report of Municipal Ombudsman be received as information. Carried.

2. CAO 66-19 New Strategic Plan 2019-22

A Motion moved by Councillor Roberts and seconded by Deputy Mayor Marks that Council adopt the Municipality of Central Elgin Strategic Plan 2019-22 as per Report CAO 66-19. Carried.

Director of Infrastructure & Community Services

1. ICS 18-19 DWQMS Management Review

Belmont Water System

There was one M.O.E. inspection conducted on the Belmont Water System since the last Management Review. It was conducted on August 21, 2019, and was an announced and focused inspection. There were no compliance issues found and no regulatory recommendations sited. A score of 100% was received.

Central Elgin Distribution System

There has been one M.O.E. inspection conducted on the Central Elgin Distribution System since the last Management Review. It was conducted on July 16, 2019, and was an unannounced focused inspection. No non-compliances were found and no recommendations were sited. A score of 100% was received.

A Motion moved by Councillor Fehr and seconded by Councillor Row that the Council of the Municipality of Central Elgin receives and accepts the Drinking Water Quality Management System (DWQMS) Management Review Minutes as per Report ICS 18-19. Carried.

Director of Financial Services/Treasurer

1. DFS 23-19 Request for Tenders CE-020-19 Southdale Line Reconstruction

Background: - The total estimated project cost is $2,756,500. This is a shared project between the City of St. Thomas and Central Elgin. Central Elgin's share of this project is $1,751,500. The City of St. Thomas's share is $1,005,000.

A Motion moved by Deputy Mayor Marks and seconded by Councillor Crevits that the Council of the Corporation of The Municipality of Central Elgin award Tender CE-020-19 Southdale Line Reconstruction to Bre-Ex Construction Inc. at a total tendered price of $2,377,659.65 exclusive of taxes; And further that Council authorizes the Mayor and CAO/Clerk to sign the contractual agreement with Bre-Ex Construction Inc. as provided in tender package CE-020-19 as per Report DFS 23-19. Carried.

Director of Fire Rescue Services/Fire Chief

1. FS 15-19 Monthly Alarm Activities Report (Nov/19)

A Motion Moved by Councillor Roberts and Seconded by Councillor Fehr that Report FS 15-19 Monthly Alarm Activities Report for November 2019 be received as information. Carried.

Director of Asset Management & Development Services

1. AMDS 06-19 November 2019 Monthly Building Report

Permit value for November 2019 $3,008,292.00
Permit value for November 2018 $1,506,000.00
Increase $1,502,292.00

Permit value for year to date (2019) $53,466,609.00
Permit value for previous year (2018) $50,345,286.00
Increase $3,121,323.00

Total permits for present year (2019) to date 388
Total permits for previous year (2018) to date 321

Total New Homes for present year (2019) to date 123
Total New Homes for previous year (2018) to date 83

A Motion moved by Deputy Mayor Marks and seconded by Councillor Crevits that Report AMDS 06-19 November 2019 Monthly Building Report be received as information. Carried.

By-laws

A Motion moved by Councillor Crevits and seconded by Councillor Row that By-laws 2433, 2434, 2435, 2436 and 2437 be taken collectively. The Motions were read a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time and finally passed collectively.

1. By-law 2433 - Confirmatory By-law

2. By-law 2434 - Appoint Committee of Adjustment

3. By-law 2435 - ZBA, 145 St. George Street

4. By-law 2436 - Council Remuneration

5. By-law 2437 - Adopt a New Municipal Customer Service/Complaint Resolution Policy

Public Notice

Resolutions

New Business

Councillor Fehr's proposal was to reconsider a decision that was made by Council on October 15th, 2019 regarding creation of 58 parking spaces for the Erie Rest parking lot. He thought that a reduction in spaces to 30 was more appropriate for the area due to traffic congestion and a smaller parking lot would have reduced environmental impact on a natural area.
A motion to reconsider the parking lot spaces was defeated due to not having a two-third majority vote.

Conversation continued concerning regulations for short-term rentals - AIR B and B's and whether to have staff prepare a report on regulating or licencing short-term rentals.

A Motion moved by Councillor Roberts and seconded by Councillor Fehr that Council direct staff to provide a report on regulating short-term rentals in Central Elgin; And bring forward that report at a future meeting of Council. Carried.

Closed Session - Council went into Closed Session at 9:12 P.M.

1. CS1 Labour Relations or Employee Negotiations (s.239(2)(d)) - Recruitment

2. CS2 Solicitor-Client Privilege (s.239(2)(f)) and/or Litigation or Potential Litigation (s.239(2)(e)) - 3767 Old Dexter Line

3. CS3 Security of Property (s.239(2)(a)) - Port Stanley Sailing Squadron Lease Renewal

4. CS4 Security of Property (s.239(2)(a)) - C.A. Bell Medical Centre Lease

5. CS5 A Position, Plan, Procedure, Criteria or Instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the Municipality or Local Board (s.239(2)(k)) - 467 Sunset Drive

Adjournment


Last Updated: Tuesday, 10 December 2019 14:50:00 PM EST

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